About your Search

20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
are here to celebrate recovery. (applause.) texas recovers is putting on this event called the big texas rally for recovery. big texas rally for recovery. wow. this is huge, because texas, of course now, is a part of promoting recovery at a statewide level. we've got people from across the state showing up to present a positive face and voice of recovery. we want you to know that recovery is possible. say it loud, say it proud, "i am in recovery!" (crowd: i am in recovery!) it's so important that this event takes place, especially in texas. for so long, people in recovery have been hidden in church basements, and they've kept their anonymity, and everybody needs to know that people do recover and live successful, productive, wonderful lives. and this is one way we can make the public aware that recovery is real, and recovery is rewarding, and recovery restores health and families. the reality of recovery is a whole, healthy community. so everybody benefits. we've got to thank everybody. it's a party out here. and that's the name of the theme for recovery month this year, is that "everyon
gas reduction and that's it, an unbundled rec from a wind farm in texas is going to lead to the same amount of carbon reduction as an unbundled rec from a wind farm in the delta or solar panel in san francisco. however, if your policy goals include local air issues, local job issues, economic development, then it does start to matter where the rec comes from. again, it doesn't necessarily matter if it's bundled or unbundled, but it does matter what type of resource it was associated with. that gets you to the california law, which it does apply to any cca that's created up to 33%. from that, the recs, there's three buckets in there, the two most important buckets are bucket 1 and bucket 3. bucket 1 says it has to be an unbundled or a bundled transaction from a facility that can deliver electricity in the california or located in the california. so, no unbundled rec in bucket 1. bucket 3 is unbundled recs and some other things in there, and the percentages that are attached to those over time, most importantly by 2020 no more than 10% of unbundled recs can be in that 33% procurement.
. >> in the park in san francisco then to go back to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make
doing drugs. we went from a nice out in texas to nothing. the next step in the process is they get linked up with a volunteer. this is the heart and soul of the public connect. we greet clients. shake their hands. ask them to follow us and talk to them as we bring them to the hall and lead them to the first station. you find they are humbling on both sides. humbling for me. it's a great opportunity to give the folks the respect they deserve and don't get enough of. >> these are the people we step over on the way to our jobs. i was thankful to the mayor. our jobs are about helping people. this is another way for us to give back to our community that treats us very well. i like the way they take you around to get you started. that's nice. they let you go and thoser the different things you need. >> are you with a program, now? >> i was a long time -- >> you want a job search? >> career planning [inaudible]. you are interested in getting into the trades? and that is where they will double check your trading skills you got and put you on a crew and you can do construction work or
people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and served as the president's advisor on civil rights issues. he was also director for civil rights at the department of human health services. tom, you will find, is passion ate and committed to equality and justice for everyone. tom, more than anyone i know, makes every single day in his life matter, whether it's focused on anti-bullying work, voting rights, disability rights, housing rights, the eighth amendment, immigration, hate crimes or human trafficking. tom cares about all of those issues to his core and he works every day to make the world a better place. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome assistant attorney general tom perez. (applause). >> good morning, it's an honor to be back here.
in the country, new york, denver, maine, texas, florida, and the bay area. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome rebecca randell. >> great, thank you, melinda. i'm going to ask you all to come up now. as they get seated i'll say a few words. all these panelists really bring a great wealth of experience and wisdom to what on the one hand is actually a really complicated issue and on the other hand at its very core is somewhat simple. whether it's online or off-line, bullying and harassment or as the teens that we encounter at common sense media often say, drama, it's about power. as you heard the boy on the video say, i'm the big dog. who has it, who wants it and who wants to keep it. i realize this is an incredibly simple definition so i will leave it to our panel to pick it apart and to delve deeper. each of our panelists will have the opportunity to give a brief introduction of who they are and their organizations and after we've done the rounds i will pose a series of questions to eefrp of they will and then you will all have the opportunity to interact with them yourselves so we can hav
's the opposite and bullied because they are smart when that is not the krult. maybe in texas where it's a different culture that we saw in the movie that perhaps football is everything and if a child isn't good at sports they're an outcast. i would like to ask how or if addressing the cultural needs at each school how can we -- is this all one way of doing this, or do you feel there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language,
read a story in texas and expulsions and suspensions are a direct pipeline to the juvenile justice system and the punitive approach doesn't fix anything. i can happily point you to that study and makes cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement nee
army in texas or a va medical center, that time of injury to time of immediate vak was 45 to 60 days. ladies and gentlemen, today if you are a warrior and you are blown up or griefously injured, on average from the time you are grievously injured to the time you arrive in my icu in bethesda is 3 days. that capability is provided to us by on screen care with unparalleled first responder action that can save the live, tourniquet therapy, clotting agents, understanding, robust immediatevac capibility, and then a continuing continuum to germany and back to the states in the c130's, the flying icu's which the air force has, which you are safer in the air at 30,000 feet than you are in 90 percent of the icu's in this country. they do not lose patients over the atlantic. they do not lose patients over the pacific and, remember, they transport them within days, days, of them being critically injured. the patient will wake up for the first time in a hospital in the states. that is often the first time they wake up. that's how fast the medevac system goes. wouldn't it be a shame to waste
folsom near sacramento. we have another redundancy center in texas. we have it all across our infrastructure and also with our teams. >> thank you. we have one question in the back. >> yes, my question is regarding your ability to bring in repair equipment or crews to make repairs or back-up equipment in case your infrastructure is broken. i know they have that capability but in this area, you know, many roads, bridges would be damaged. do you have your own internal aviation capability or lift capability to bring in those repair equipment and crews or is that something that you would be looking to other organizations to provide that airlift capability? >> start with mr. johnson. >> yeah, we have some limited capability in terms of aircraft and on site helicopters in our outskirting area, but in terms of a major event in the san francisco bay area, we would be heavily focused on those folks who provide that service to us under contract. we do not have our own helicopters in oakland or san francisco itself, as was already mentioned to, san francisco is very difficult to get
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)